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The WyzGuy Radio Show with Jason Michael -Helping Today's Glass Artist Think Like an Artistic Entrepreneur

The WyzGuy Radio Show is dedicated to Educating and Inspiring through conversations with todays top-talents in the world of glass. Along with Artists, Host Jason Michael shares conversations with experts in areas pertaining to law, health, and business in hopes to bring light to areas of concern. Whether its heavy metal toxins, paying taxes, or how to properly set up a glass studio, we have a ton of fun in store for you.
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Now displaying: April, 2016
Apr 30, 2016

Episode 102- Overcoming Adversity. 

 

Hey yo.    This is a very important topic to cover and consider when it comes to figuring out if you truly have the grit to overcome the constant obstacles and disappointments that come along with being a glass artist. 

 

 

"The most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss, and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity, and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, and a deep loving concern. Beautiful people do not just happen."  -  Elizabeth Kubler-Ross 

 

COMMENTS

 ________________________________________________________

chemglass.com
ABOUT SEA CUBE
Sea Cube Co was established in 2001 by Christopher Bock.

Chris is a glassblower and has worked his way up through the ranks from 
assembly worker to senior glassblower. His main focus has always been 
scientific glassware, with a major focus on petrochemical products.

With exposure through the American Scientific Glassblowers Society (ASGS), 
Chris has come to appreciate and dabble in artistic glass. Over the years 
through formal education and experimentation, Chris has embraced the 
artistic side of the craft.


Chris currently works as a glassblower for a small manufacturer as well 
as owning and operating Sea Cube Co. He is a long-standing member 
of the Delaware Valley Section of ASGS and is currently serving as 
Vice Chairman for the Section. He has served as a consultant 
to many of the glass companies locally and has been sought out on a 
national scale for unique, specialty items as well as intricate, detailed repairs.

Sea Cube Co is happy to talk to you about all your needs, just drop a line!

facebook.com/seacubeco

COMMENTS
_______________________________________________

SPONSORS:

Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 

 


SEACUBECO.com


Greenflashglass.com 

 

 

 

Apr 26, 2016

Episode 101-5 reasons that you should take a class no matter what skill level you are at

1.General studio setup from a organizational and safety perspective 

2.Understanding of tools and material for example various ways of using certain tools as well as knowing your rod and  tubing sizes

3.Grasp a true sense of the studio environment from the reality of the heat in the studio to how you can avoid cuts and burns like keeping a clean bench panties and rods and blowpipe polished and your bench organized and clean

4.Learn how to plan out whatever it is you're going to make from the sketch to the material list to the process of making it on paper first before even turning your torch on

5.gives you a way to either learn something new or improve upon something that you are already making and reinforces confidence. 


chemglass.com
ABOUT SEA CUBE
Sea Cube Co was established in 2001 by Christopher Bock.

Chris is a glassblower and has worked his way up through the ranks from 
assembly worker to senior glassblower. His main focus has always been 
scientific glassware, with a major focus on petrochemical products.

With exposure through the American Scientific Glassblowers Society (ASGS), 
Chris has come to appreciate and dabble in artistic glass. Over the years 
through formal education and experimentation, Chris has embraced the 
artistic side of the craft.


Chris currently works as a glassblower for a small manufacturer as well 
as owning and operating Sea Cube Co. He is a long-standing member 
of the Delaware Valley Section of ASGS and is currently serving as 
Vice Chairman for the Section. He has served as a consultant 
to many of the glass companies locally and has been sought out on a 
national scale for unique, specialty items as well as intricate, detailed repairs.

Sea Cube Co is happy to talk to you about all your needs, just drop a line!

facebook.com/seacubeco

COMMENTS
_______________________________________________

SPONSORS:

Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 


SEACUBECO.com


Greenflashglass.com 

 

Apr 20, 2016
Episode 100- Rashan Jones    Follow up from Episode 1-3
 
     Rashan was the catapult that helped me truly get into my comfort zone when it came to launching this podcast. His love for glass, educating and life in general made our first conversation relaxed and fun. It truly made the experience on my end feel more natural and gave me confidence to continue down this path. With every edit, tweak, mistake and sound adjustment, The WyzGuy Radio SHow has taken on a life of its own and has grown faster then I had ever dreamed. You can find Rashan online at High Desert Flameworks as well as on instagram @jonesofig
 
     With over 20,000 downloads( that doesn't include the listens...itunes tech stuff) this show has become a goto for today's glass artist who's studio and life is filled with creativity and technology. It is an honor to produce this show weekly and an opportunity that I truly feel blessed to have.  With thousands of hours of prodution under my belt, I am continuing to evolve the show and fine tune it as it finds it place in the podcast space. As the only continuing Glass Blowing based podcast it is a unique opportunity for all of us to find ways to use to our advantage. 
 
If you'd like to be a guest and share your glass journey with the world please contact me and let me know. If you'd like to use this platform to promote your work as well as any projects you have going on this is a perfect place to do that. I have put together several package levels of sponsorship giving you an affordable outlet of promotion.
 
for more info contact me at info@wyzguyradio.com
 
LOVE YOU AND THANK YOU FOR THE CONTINUED SUPPORT
 
____________________________________________________________
SPONSORS
 

Sea Cube Co was established in 2001 by Christopher Bock.

Chris is a glassblower and has worked his way up through the ranks from 
assembly worker to senior glassblower. His main focus has always been 
scientific glassware, with a major focus on petrochemical products.

With exposure through the American Scientific Glassblowers Society (ASGS), 
Chris has come to appreciate and dabble in artistic glass. Over the years 
through formal education and experimentation, Chris has embraced the 
artistic side of the craft.

 
Chris currently works as a glassblower for a small manufacturer as well 
as owning and operating Sea Cube Co. He is a long-standing member 
of the Delaware Valley Section of ASGS and is currently serving as 
Vice Chairman for the Section. He has served as a consultant 
to many of the glass companies locally and has been sought out on a 
national scale for unique, specialty items as well as intricate, detailed repairs.

 
 
 
 
Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 
APRIL 2016
Borosilicate Sale
AccuGrind Joints 25% Off
 
Coupon Code: ACCUGRIND
To receive the discount, enter ACCUGRIND in the coupon code field during online checkout, or mention it on the phone with a sales representative. Sale applies to both pieces as well as cases but does not combine with volume discount.
To use multiple coupon codes online, enter the additional codes in the field marked multiple coupon codes. We will apply the discounts once we receive the order.
 
APRIL 2016
Soft Glass COE 104 Sale
Mandrels and Bead Release 20% Off
 
Coupon Code: BEAD
To receive the discount, enter BEAD in the coupon code field during online checkout or mention it to a sales representative over the phone. 
 
To use multiple coupon codes online, enter the additional codes in the field marked multiple coupon codes. We will apply the additional discounts once we receive the order.
 
 
 
Greenflashglass.com 
 
 
 
Apr 20, 2016

Episode 99- Bob Harley Dawg...Yes ..thats his real name..

This is a killer show where Bob and I dive in deep talking business, glass, and passion. If you are not able to handle rejection, criticism, and temporary defeat then you should go find a job instead of pursuing the life of a glass artist.

 

Bob helps moderate the Torch Talk group on Facebook as well as helps coordinate live glassblowing in a virtual studio call The Living Tree. If you've never seen flame work or lampwork its also known as, check this link as watch artists from all over the world creating work in their studios.

Google hangouts

 

find Bib on instagram at Dawghouseglass or his youtube channel

Dawg House Glass video techs

 

__________________________________________________________________

SPONSORS:

chemglass.com
 
 
COMMENTS
_______________________________________________
 
SPONSORS:
 
Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 
APRIL 2016
Borosilicate Sale
AccuGrind Joints 25% Off
 
Coupon Code: ACCUGRIND
To receive the discount, enter ACCUGRIND in the coupon code field during online checkout, or mention it on the phone with a sales representative. Sale applies to both pieces as well as cases but does not combine with volume discount.
To use multiple coupon codes online, enter the additional codes in the field marked multiple coupon codes. We will apply the discounts once we receive the order.
 
APRIL 2016
Soft Glass COE 104 Sale
Mandrels and Bead Release 20% Off
 
Coupon Code: BEAD
To receive the discount, enter BEAD in the coupon code field during online checkout or mention it to a sales representative over the phone. 
 
To use multiple coupon codes online, enter the additional codes in the field marked multiple coupon codes. We will apply the additional discounts once we receive the order.
 
 
SEACUBECO.com
ABOUT SEA CUBE

Sea Cube Co was established in 2001 by Christopher Bock.

Chris is a glassblower and has worked his way up through the ranks from
assembly worker to senior glassblower. His main focus has always been
scientific glassware, with a major focus on petrochemical products.

With exposure through the American Scientific Glassblowers Society (ASGS),
Chris has come to appreciate and dabble in artistic glass. Over the years
through formal education and experimentation, Chris has embraced the
artistic side of the craft.

Chris currently works as a glassblower for a small manufacturer as well
as owning and operating Sea Cube Co. He is a long-standing member
of the Delaware Valley Section of ASGS and is currently serving as
Vice Chairman for the Section. He has served as a consultant
to many of the glass companies locally and has been sought out on a
national scale for unique, specialty items as well as intricate, detailed repairs.

Sea Cube Co is happy to talk to you about all your needs, just drop a line!

 
 
 
 
Apr 19, 2016

Hey yo!!!     Episode 98- Why are you a glass artist!?!   This question is inspired from a recent conference my Wife and I attended this past weekend called The SMART Conference which was orchestrated by Dave Ramsey.  It was such an amazing event full of inspiration.  The first take away I got out of this event came from a comedian named Michael Jr.   He posed the question to the 6,000 plus attendees asking.. "What is your punchline ?"   Meaning at the end of the day why are you doing what you do and how is it helping others?   So I ask of you Why are you a glass artist?    Is it to support your family? , give you a creative outlet , because you think it's cool or you wanna be a rock star?    I truly would like to know. So send me your answers to info@wyzguyradio.com and tell me about it 

Apr 18, 2016

For close to 20 years Will Menzies has been an advocate for the functional glass artist through educating and mentoring. Between running a full production studio producing his product line called the American helix as well as coproducing The Flow magazine with his wife Jennifer, Will is one busy productive dude.

You can find him on Instagram @Iambox "fan or @Americanhelix 

 

____________________


chemglass.com

facebook.com/seacubeco

COMMENTS
_______________________________________________

SPONSORS:

Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 


SEACUBECO.com


Greenflashglass.com 

Since its inception, the focus of The Flow
has been to provide a bond among members of the lampworking community.
 
This has been accomplished by developing relationships with the finest artists & sharing their techniques with you through in-depth, step-by-step tutorials.
In every issue you can enjoy great content with the hottest artists and cutting edge techniques using the latest industry products.
These features along with the continuation of our Women in Glass edition, Glasscraft Emerging Artist Awards, inspiring gallery showcases
 dynamic general interest articles, as well as health and safety information make The Flow the leading international lampworking journal. 

 

The Helix is a revolutionary new concept in smoking technology. Manufactured by our scientific glassblowers, this pipe is light years ahead of its time.
The Helix creates a swirling motion inside the funnel shaped chamber of the pipe. The motion of the smoke is created by precision micro-holes that produce the intake for the system.
This process aerates the smoke while cooling it. 

Based on Bernoulli's Principle, the shape of the pipe creates a Venturi Effect.
This results in a slower burn that conserves tobacco and gives a smooth, refreshing smoke; making the Helix the smoothest hitting pipe on the market.
for further info or locate their products you can find them on facebook at
facebook.com/sshelix
or contact them
signaturehelix@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

Apr 15, 2016

Engineering room airflow may present a real challenge when balancing an HVAC system. Most calculations only use the heat loss or gain of a room to decide on required airflow and often don’t take into consideration required room ventilation needs. Let’s take a look at how an air change calculation may simplify this step in your air balancing.

What is an Air Change?

An air change is how many times the air enters and exits a room from the HVAC system in one hour. Or, how many times a room would fill up with the air from the supply registers in sixty minutes.  

You can then compare the number of room air changes to the Required Air Changes Table below. If it’s in the range, you can proceed to design or balance the airflow and have an additional assurance that you’re doing the right thing. If it’s way out of range, you’d better take another look.

The Air Changes Formula

To calculate room air changes, measure the supply airflow into a room, multiply the CFM times 60 minutes per hour. Then divide by the volume of the room in cubic feet:

 

In plain English, we’re changing CFM into Cubic Feet per Hour (CFH). Then we calculate the volume of the room by multiplying the room height times the width times the length. Then we simply divide the CFH by the volume of the room.

Here’s an example of how a full formula works:

Now, compare 7.5 air changes per hour to the required air changes for that type of room on the Air Changes per Hour Table below. If it’s a lunch or break room that requires 7-8 air changes per hour, you’re right on target. If it’s a bar that needs 15-20 air changes per hour, it’s time to reconsider.

 

 

 

Room CFM Formula

Let’s look at this engineering formula differently. For example, what if the airflow is unknown and you need to calculate the required CFM for a room? Here is a four-step process on how to calculate the room CFM:

Step One – Use the above Air Changes per Hour Table to identify the required air changes needed for the use of the room. Let’s say it’s a conference room requiring 10 air changes per hour.

Step Two - Calculate the volume of the room (L’xW’xH’).

Step Three - Multiply the volume of the room by the required room air changes.

Step Four Divide the answer by 60 minutes per Hour to find the required room CFM:

 

Here’s an example of how to work the formula:

 

 

 

When designing or balancing a system requiring additional airflow for ventilation purposes, remember this room will normally demand constant fan operation when occupied. This may present a problem for other rooms on the same zone, so take that into consideration.

Many of these rooms may require a significant amount of outdoor air. The BTU content of this air has to be included in the heat gain or heat loss of the building when determining the size of the heating and cooling equipment.

Practice these calculations several times in the shop or office. Then do the calculations in the field several times over the next week to check airflow in rooms with uncommon ventilation requirements. Study the Air Changes per Hour Table to become familiar with the rooms that need more ventilation than the heating or cooling load requires.

 
Rob “Doc” Falke serves the industry as president of National Comfort Institute, an HVAC-based training company and membership organization. If you're an HVAC contractor or technician interested in a free Air Changes Calculation Procedure, contact Doc atrobf@ncihvac.com or call him at 800-633-7058. Go to NCI’s website atnationalcomfortinstitute.com for free information, articles, and downloads.
 
Depending on your setup there are A variety of systems to set up for ventilation.
 
  • Fan and window enter
  • Hood with ventilation
When setting up your bench space the ventilation is an integral component to the studio. Build your bench around your ventilation
 
Fan in window method
 
For most of us this is the most practical set up.
But it also depends on your space. If you have a window installing a fan in the space is quite simple. One way is to remove the window and replace it with the frame and plywood with the fan mounted in it. One issue you can run into with this set up is overheating the fan motor so make sure your bench is a minimum of 3 feet from the wall and that your torch/flame is it pointing directly at the fan. Depending on your space building a box around your fan and space is ideal. If your space is small enough a box isn't necessary but a cover over the top of the fan is ideal. This way you can control the direction of the airflow containing it and leaving through your fan
 
Most high velocity floor fans are plenty adequate for this need all you need to do is disassembled the fan mounting the back half of the fan to your plywood saving the other side of the cage for the outside of the plywood. For example if your fan is 18 inches in diameter then cut your opening to 17 to 17 1/2 inches giving you space to mount the cage to the plywood giving the blades freedom to move without hitting the plywood. Another more practical option besides using the other half of the fans cage is to purchase a gable vents for the opening of the window or to cover the space of the opening of the fan. This will keep birds from flying into your fan as well as Bermance and whether out of the shop. As we all know an 18 inch fan traveling at a high rate of speed can be quite dangerous if not protected so cover your ass along with those around you. This type of set up is the most affordable only costing around $75-$100. 
 
There is a link to a PDF checklist in the show notes
 
 
The second more efficient set up is a hood or HVAC system this set up is ideal for larger space, multiple torch set ups or any varmint without windows. 
 
This can get expensive but on a budget you can accomplish in adequate set up. For starters you will need to build your bench and incorporate a hood or depending on your set up a box that your work inside of. Without getting into a larger HVAC system here is the basic way that you can create it on a budget.
 
First thing you want to do is build your space again like mounting a fan in the window your area that you're working in should be around 6 feet wide by 4 feet deep by 4 feet high. This will basically build yourself a box to work inside of that will give you the most adequate suction and airflow for your ventilation next you're going to want to look for a hood of some sort. Look on craigslist garage sales or other sales at your lake local home good stores and get a used or new kitchen hood. This will become the housing and space that your air will flow through. However you won't be using the fan in the hood just the housing so go basic. Next you'll need an in-line fan or a blower fan preferably 6 to 8 inches in diameter which will give you a round 300 CFM's or more and only cost around $85-$150 next you'll need your duct which will go from the top of your hood and then mount to the outside of your fan shroud. Typically the blower fans taper down to allow for the duck work to fit around it securely and then security even more so with a large hose clamp. Depending on where you are venting out your bad air you can either run it to a window that is near you or in front of your bench and then add a section of duct to the other side of the fan so that way your fan is basically sandwiched between two sections of ductwork. The outflow Side of the fan with its duck work attached candy run again through a window or out a door but remember that ideally you want to minimize the amount of turns and Ben's in your ductwork to minimize internal static pressure which slows down airflow especially when you deal with 90° bends so try to avoid a acute angle like a 90° band and arch is more ideal
 
The installation process is quite simple as long as you know some basic construction it's not that difficult to do. If you have already built your bench and your box which also includes a roof or ceiling in the box itself it'll be where you mount your hood. The top of the hood
Will have a taper collar which will be the diameter of the circle let you cut in the ceiling of your box allowing the vent hood to be secured onto the ceiling with that extension pushing through and then on the other side you will then attach the first section of ductwork which will then run to your fan and then for the fan you have another section of ductwork which that runs either out of A window or door but the goal again is to get this toxic air out of and away from your space. The breakdown on costs your fan will cost anywhere from $80-$150 the hood will cost anywhere from $30-$50 you can find 25 foot duck work that is 8 inches in diameter will cost a proximately $20 and then you can get a wall Which is very similar to ones attached to duck work for a dryer which will give you a clean look in the end of the process part of the consideration as well is whether you own or rent your house so make sure if you rent that you get permission from your landlord to do any and all of the above they do not want surprises and it will be a quick way for you to become evicted or have the police called.
 
Now that you have figured out your estimated CFM requirements for your space and the fan and box set up that you are required to have for this space you now I need to take into consideration how much and where you were getting your make up air. Your make up air is basically fresh air comes from the outside allowing your space to equalize The static pressures in the room and also continue to bring you and oxygen which is obviously viable for Long Jevity. This can come from an exterior open-door a window or garage door but the most important area to consider is where is the fresh air coming from and the direction it is blowing in the studio space. To ensure proper ventilation it is important to make sure the fresh air isn't blowing across your bench or interfering with your torch. If there isn't enough air coming you will be dealing with static air issues which means you're not refreshing air equally literally sucking the oxygen out of the room faster than you are replacing it. This will lead to an unhealthy environment and potential health issues in the future or worse if your studio is attached to your house you could potential he suck the air out of your house or in the winter your heat. If you run a gas furnace carbon monoxide poisoning could be an issue. I recommend buying a carbon monoxide detector her which is very fordable and in the end could save your life especially since carbon monoxide is known as the silent killer just like high blood pressure. If you do have a garage door I recommend either opening it all the way or at the least halfway giving you a good amount of fresh air coming in the studio. You could also get a Nother fan that would blow air in from the outside as well hoping to refresh your air quality in your space. 
 
In conclusion the ventilation is the most important part of your studio set up. If you take the time and spend the money upfront you have a cleaner super studio giving you a healthy environment for years to come. Cutting corners in the long run can be deadly. I hope this is helped give you some clarity on Waze to set up your studio space especially your ventilation on a budget with the most adequate possible ventilation set up you could have. There are a few links in the show notes that will take you to a website that deals with HVAC systems along with ways to calculate how much CFM you are required based on your space that you are in I also have links to materials and products referred in this topic as well as a few diagrams or examples on the recommendations discussed in this episode 
 
OUR NEWEST SPONSOR: THE FLOW MAGAZINE
 
     Since its inception, the focus of The Flowhas been to provide a bond among members of the lampworking community.This has been accomplished by developing relationships with the finest artists & sharing their techniques with you through in-depth, step-by-step tutorials.In every issue you can enjoy great content with the hottest artists and cutting edge techniques using the latest industry products.
These features along with the continuation of our Women in Glass edition, Glasscraft Emerging Artist Awards, inspiring gallery showcases dynamic general interest articles, as well as health and safety information make The Flow the leading international lampworking journal. 
 
 
 
chemglass.com
 
 
 
COMMENTS
_______________________________________________
 
SPONSORS:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Apr 9, 2016

Episode Adrienne Ladd aka GlassHappy 

  Hey what's happening?  This is a fun conversation and follow up with Adrienne Ladd. You can find her on Instagram @glasshappy and see all her fun happenings in her glass world.  She has been dealing with some serious health issues that were exasperated from being in the glass studio and after a few years of Doctor appointments, screenings and being told she was crazy, she has finally been properly diagnosed  Undifferentiated Connective Disease which is very similar to Lupus.   She tells us about how diet, mindset and changes in her environment have literally saved her life and glass career.  
Auto Inmune Paleo Protocol diet


We also get into some glass talk regarding the current state of the cadmium issues in the industry and I share a very "strong" opinion about how I feel about certain business practices going on in the functional glass industry.  

Enjoy and please feel free to drop me a line and say hello, leave a question or comment and let me know what your up to!!!  

Here's Adro's link to her previous episode 
Adro- episode 33

 



COMMENTS
_______________________________________________

SPONSORS:

Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 


SEACUBECO.com


Greenflashglass.com 

 

Apr 5, 2016

 

Chris is a glassblower and has worked his way up through the ranks from 
assembly worker to senior glassblower. His main focus has always been 
scientific glassware, with a major focus on petrochemical products.
With exposure through the American Scientific Glassblowers Society (ASGS), 
Chris has come to appreciate and dabble in artistic glass. Over the years 
through formal education and experimentation, Chris has embraced the 
artistic side of the craft.
Chris is the owner and Glassblower for his company, Sea Cube Co. He is a long-standing member 
of the Delaware Valley Section of ASGS and is currently serving as 
Director for the Section. He has served as a consultant 
to many of the glass companies locally and has been sought out on a 
national scale for unique, specialty items as well as intricate, detailed repairs.

chemglass.com

facebook.com/seacubeco

COMMENTS
_______________________________________________

SPONSORS:

Mountain Glass Arts- April 2016 sale 


SEACUBECO.com


Greenflashglass.com 

 

 

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