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The WyzGuy Radio Show with Jason Michael -Helping Today's Glass Artist Think Like an Artistic Entrepreneur

The WyzGuy Radio Show is dedicated to Educating and Inspiring through conversations with todays top-talents in the world of glass. Along with Artists, Host Jason Michael shares conversations with experts in areas pertaining to law, health, and business in hopes to bring light to areas of concern. Whether its heavy metal toxins, paying taxes, or how to properly set up a glass studio, we have a ton of fun in store for you.
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Now displaying: August, 2016
Aug 26, 2016

www.wyzguymedia.com/123

Episode 123- Jeremy Grant-Levine AKA Germ and 1000 glass cranes

Germ (Jeremy Grant-Levine) is a Philadelphia based glass artist and teacher.  His parents are both artists and encouraged him to experiment with all materials from a very young age. Germ has a degree in Scientific glassblowing and spent several years working in the scientific glass industry, before returning to making art full time.  He has traveled extensively, collaborating and learning from some of the best glassblowers in the country.  He has been teaching in studios around the US and internationally for the past few years.  

Germs work is always in flux.  One series of work could focus on the sea and his New England up bringing (Smoke on the Water, 2015) and the next could reference eastern spiritual practices and communal ritual (Tools for Enlightenment, 2016).  For many years he experimented with traditional German glassblowing techniques and tried to give them a more contemporary feel.
Currently he is starting a project called 1000 glass cranes.  He seeks to follow the ancient Japanese tradition of Senbazuru, folding 1000 origami cranes.  The legend is that if you fold 1000 cranes in a year, you are granted good fortune, health, luck, or a wish.  His vision is to do this but with glass
 
1000 Glass Cranes
 
The modern world is moving too fast and we are always onto the next task before we can even finish or evaluate the last. 1000 Glass Cranes is a project focused on spending a full year on one large idea. One artist, without assistance, on a quest for balance. This project is about creating an immersive experience for the artist throughout the year and also the audience as participants during the final exhibit. Once the year and thousand cranes are complete, they will all be displayed at Ruckus Gallery in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in a massive installation.
 
Jeremy Grant-Levine AKA Germ has been blowing glass for 13 years. As a working artist, he has made a name for himself in the glass pipe sub-culture, as one of the most technical and innovative makers in the industry. Mixing classical shapes and modern silhouettes, he is able to transform his pieces from merely function into sculptural showpieces. ​His work has been displayed in galleries in Seattle, Philadelphia, New York, Miami, and Tel Aviv. He has taught workshops and collaborated with other artists all over the world. 
 
Kickstarter campaign is live through September 27, 2016 to raise funds and support to get this project started. Updates and insights into the many layers of this expansive project can be found at www.1000glasscranes.com
 
____________________________________________________________________
 

Aug 22, 2016
 
 
meyers briggs  test   http://www.myersbriggs.org/my-mbti-personality-type/mbti-basics/
 
 
http://www.oxygenfrog.com/oxygen-systems.html
 
 
https://mikeaurelius.wordpress.com/ventilation-primer/
 
 
Crashing the Kiln Round
 
 
 
- if you could work with any living glass artist that you haven't worked with before who is it and why? jolex- joel meyers
-if could describe the sound of glass cracking in one word what is it?-Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuk??!!??
-top 5 favorite colors?- 
  1. brilliant blue
  2. aqua mist
  3. purple lilac
  4. half blood
  5. serum
-worse injury In the studio -burn from flame on tt
 
-do you have any glass blowing themed tattoos. - no
 
- if you were stranded an island (Fantasy island) that had a glass studio on it and only supplied  your gases and kiln and your torch and you had to make something In order to survive
 what 5-items would you bring? 
  1. jacks
  2. steel head claw grabber
  3. jaws tool
  4. glasses
  5. tooling rollers
 
@mikemasonglass
-mikemasondesign.com
-torchtalk.com
-facebook.com/torchtalk
-facebook.com/mikemason
 
 
 
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A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS

Mountain Glass Arts The premier distributor of glassblowing and lampwork supplies
The Flow Magazine A glass journal for the flame working community
American Helix The original Helix Pipe from American Helix glass is the perfect glass pipe for the smoker who prefers their science mixed with art. Made in the USA, Helix pipes feature a traditional spoon pipe bowl and neck design with a Venturi funnel body. The trinity Venturi inlets cool the smoke providing smooth hits without water diffusion while creating a swirling smoke show.
 
 
 
 
 
Aug 18, 2016

 

Episode 121- Best of featuring MIke Souza: Princeton University's Glass Man

Send me an email

Michael J Souza Princeton University Dept. of Chemistry Frick Lab /Glass Shop 
Job Title: Professional Specialist / Scientific Glassblower

Employment History:
Princeton University Princeton NJ 1992 - present -Hired as an hourly employee - Promoted in 1994 to Tech Staff III

W. A. Sales LTD., Wheeling, IL 1986- 92

- Master Glassblower and Shop Foreman

- Oversaw operations at Northwestern University & The University of Chicago

Wyse Glass, Midland, MI 1986-88

-Master Glassblower

- Became business partner for small custom shop that serviced Dow Corning

-Dissolved partnership as Dow/Corning faced Chapter 11 from lawsuits involving breast implants

W. A. Sales LTD., Wheeling, IL 1980-86

-Master Glassblower

-Shift Foreman

-In 1981 the company established a contract shop at Northwestern University and I ran the shop full time at the university

Valley Design Corp. Littleton, MA 1978-80

-Master Glassblower

-Head of Glassblowing Dept.

Aldrich Chemical, Milwaukee WI 1977-78

-Completed my Journeyman program under Dieter Dammrow

W. A. Sales Ltd., Wheeling IL 1975 -77

-Journeyman at a custom shop to work more independently

Kontes / Martin, Evanston, IL 1973-75

-Apprentice at the shop where my father was Production Manager Education

-Graduated as Honor Student at Palatine High School -Attended Oakton Community College

 

Aug 12, 2016
Episode 120- Talking Dragons with Mike Luna 
 
What's going on?? Thanks for tuning in and continuing to follow the show.  This was a great conversation with one Mike Luna, someone who's work I have personally admired for close to a decade. Currently Mike is known for his line of dragons but when you dive into Mikes glass past he has a wide variety of work in his portfolio. We discuss his beginnings, what inspires his work as well as discussing his techniques used as he applies color and creates his masterpieces.  Hope you enjoy this fun chat with Mike Luna. 
 
Hello! My name is Michael Luna, I was born in Torrence, CA in 1978. I was raised in Santa Fe Springs CA up until I was 15 then I moved to O'brien Oregon to start High School at Illinois Valley High. After high school in 1996 I moved back to Los Angeles where I work in automotive retail.
By this time my older brother (Chris) had already started his journey of glassblowing. He would tell me on the phone how cool it was! So fast forward to 1999 when I get a phone call from Chris, he said "hey bro, wanna job" I dropped my whole life and moved back to Oregon. I worked in a production shop ran by a guy named Gilbert Velosco (still friends till this day) throughout the time I was there I made friends with a soon to be legend, Darby Holm. Darby took me under his wing and started to apprentice me in about 2000. learning under Darby changed my life! He and the Holms are like family to me. Well, I'm still in Oregon constantly learning and trying different things with glass. 
 
  
@mikeluna300 on instagram

 

Aug 8, 2016
SECRET SANTA PENDANT TRADE SIGN UP
 
WyzGuy Radio Facebook Group Page  or email Contact via Email
 
please include your full name and shipping info  we will randomly pair you up with another artist and forward their info after
August 15th(the deadline to enter)
 
 
 
Episode 119- Waste vs. Scrap
 
 

For merchants, cost accounting is rather useful. The idea behind it is simple: buy cheap, sell expensive. To maximize your profits, you should use your limited resources (money) for activities that give you the best return on your investment.

Manufacturing, on the other hand, was usually less concerned with bookkeeping. With the different materials coming in and products going out, tools needed, and time used, it would have been difficult to keep track of it all. Historic manufacturers probably used more of a gut-feeling approach and experience to set their prices. Besides, their goal was often not profit maximization, but merely to have a good life. As Daniel Defoe observed: “There’s nothing more frequent, than for an Englishman to work till he has got his pocket full of money, and then go and be […] drunk, till, tis all gone.”
 
 
 
 
when manufacturing product each item has a specific COG required to complete.  this incudes the raw material to create,(direct cost), plus the gases, and labor(indirect costs)
 
part of this issue is whether or not we should determine the waste left after the manufacturing process of said item. Whether you pull points or attach blowpipes, there will be material that is scrap and considered waste. In some fields scrap is considered reusable so for this chat I will be referring to the leftovers as waste which is unable to be reused and therefor sold.
 
to use the food industry for an example they have plenty of waste associated with the manufacturing of meals. for example, If broccoli is on the menu then a bulk order of broccoli is needed.   say each head of broccoli weighs 1lb and comes in a 10lb box that cost $20.00.  . this would mean the cost of each unit of broccoli costs $2.00      Now when the broccoli is being processed to cook  a portion of the broccoli is removed and would be considered waste. lets use 50% as how much of the broccoli is removed which would mean 50% is left.   this would bring the true cost of each unit to $4.00 per headof broccoli since technically we just removed 50% of the weight but it still cost us $20.00 total.  
 
we can use the same concept when it comes to calculating cost of goods manufactured.  say for example a 2lb.- 3" wrap and rake spoon costs .50 to make in direct cost (raw material)and an additional  indirect cost(overhead) of .50.   this unit  would initially cost $1.00 to manufacture. after the item is made you are left with a little bit of waste which for the sake  of this example lets call it  1/2 lb of material.   when weestimated our baseline costs for each item we figured a 3"w/r spoon weighs 2lbs (chunky spoon) which costs $1.00 to make,  so if we do the math and break down the cost,  we can determine that the waste costs (.50/lb=.25 in waste)  now if you work for a week and manufacture 100- 3'wrap and rakes you will have an estimated amount of waste at $25.00   multiply that by 12- months and  you'll see that theres approx $300.00 in waste.   this is one way to look at it.. 100/week=$25.00 in waste 
 
the other perspective is to increase the direct cost to manufacture each item by adding the waste back into the peice.   We figured to waste cost .25 and the actual item when complete weighs 1.5lbs.  so you can then add the .25 back into the cost to manufacture the item which would mean the 1.5lbs of material costs $1.00.
 
in the end talk to your accountant and ask them what they recomend you do to keep track of this info.  whether A- you seperate the true cost to manufacture from waste. or B. you ignore the waste but increase the cost of goods by the amount of the value you predetermined for the item manufactured.
 
Either way before you begin adding new items to your catalog, estimate the direct cost(raw material) to manufacture as well as Overhead(indirect cost) when figuring out costs per item made. this will not only give you a baseline cost of your new products it will also give you a base line number to price your item to be sold at  both wholesale and retail.   
 
 
 
Manufacturing cost is the sum of costs of all resources consumed in the process of making a product. The manufacturing cost is classified into three categories: direct materials cost, direct labor cost and manufacturing overhead.
 

What are manufacturing costs?

Manufacturing costs are the costs necessary to convert raw materials into products. All manufacturing costs must be attached to the units produced for external financial reporting under US GAAP. The resulting unit costs are used for inventory valuation on the balance sheet and for the calculation of the cost of goods sold on the income statement.

Manufacturing costs are typically divided into three categories...
  1. Direct materials. This is the cost of the materials which become part of the finished product. For example, the cost of wood is a direct material in the manufacture of wooden furniture.
  2. Direct labor. This is the cost of the wages of the individuals who are physically involved in converting raw materials into a finished product. For example, the wages of the person cutting wood into the specified lengths and the wages of the assemblers are direct labor costs in a furniture factory.
  3. Factory overhead or manufacturing overhead. Factory overhead refers to all other costs incurred in the manufacturing activity which cannot be directly traced to physical units in an economically feasible way. The wages of the person who inspects the completed furniture and the depreciation on the factory equipment are part of the factory overhead costs. Factory overhead is also described as indirect manufacturing costs.

Deduction for Food Waste

Restaurants, grocers and other businesses that carry food in inventory can deduct the cost of purchasing all of their food supplies like any other ordinary business expense. The business gains the tax deduction as soon as it incurs the expense, regardless of whether the food is sold to a customer or tossed into a dumpster. Because the deduction reduces the business’ taxable income, the total savings depends on at what rate the business is taxed.
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